The Swedish Election Could Makes Things Very Messy For EU

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The Riksdag building in Stockholm, seat of the Swedish National Assembly

Swedish elections are usually fairly dull affairs, the differences between the mainstream center-left and center-right political groupings have not been all that significant for decades. The election to be held next weekend however, is unusual for two reasons. First, the rise of the Eurosceptic Swedish Democrat party (SD) has disrupted the traditional left vs right dynamic in Swedish politics which has been solidly pro EU and fully supportive of the project to merge the membership of 27 sovereign states into a federal superstate.

The other aspect of the SD’s rise has been their willingness to discuss the detrimental effect on liberal, tolerant Swedish society of an uncontrolled influx of Muslim migrants from some very backward societies. If polls are correct (and they have previously underestimated support for the SD’s,) their increased support is likely to make it difficult for anyone to form a stable government after the elections.

Another factor, though less well publicised because it concerns the financial markets and is is rather technical, is that as the Russian / Chinese push to remove the status of the US$ as global reserve currency, the Swedish krona (SEK) has become a marker for global risk sentiment, depreciating at signs of escalating trade tensions or emerging market stress. The wobbly housing market, a peaking economy, and the easy credit offered by the Riksbank have also undermined SEK.

According to polls and history neither the current center-left government nor the center-right opposition alliance is likely to win a majority in September. Both blocks are polling below 40%, and the top parties on both sides (the Social Democrats and the Conservatives (Moderaterna) are headed for historically poor showings.

Neither government nor opposition coalitions looks likely to be able to govern without support from the SD’s, which has continued to gain popularity despite efforts to smear them as racist, far right and neo — Nazi.

As happened in Italy most recently and other EU nations in the past few years, smear campaigns aimed at branding parties that oppose the globalist narrative as racist and fascist have backfired somewhat. A classic example was Germany’s inconclusive election a year ago this month, in which a campaign of outrageous misrepresentations by politicians of the establishment parties, the ‘center right’ Christian Democrats and the ‘center left’ Social Democrats and the majority of mainstream media only increased support for Eurosceptic, immigration control supporting parties Alternatif fur Deutschland and the classical liberal Free Democrats. That election left Chancellor Merkel clinging to power by her fingertips.

The electorates in the developed nations are not as ignorant as politicians and mainstream media like to depict them. One Swedish voter, responding to a hysterical tirade against people thinking of voting for the Sweden Democrats told a TV vox pop spot, “I’m a nationalist not a racist.” The conflation of nationalism with racism or fascism is a regular tactic of the globalist consensus in politics, and it is completely dishonest. On getting comments on my posts when I, for very well thought out reasons, supported Brexit in my posts I responded to comments suggesting the resurgence of nationalism in Europe would lead to the rise of new Nazi and fascist demagogues by pointing out that Gandhi was a nationalist as were Guiseppe Garibaldi, Eammon De Valera, Kemal Ataturk (moderniser of Turkey,) and Nelson Mandela. Not all nationalists are benign, but nationalism is not a synonym of fascism (which means ‘power through strength’).

Sweden looks like being the latest shock for the globalists, people who want a global, meritocratic government, which could only work against liberal values such as free speech as one of the stated aims of the global movement is to create a global culture or to put it bluntly to suppress all national and ethnic cultures. The problem with such thinking is that power becomes progressively more remote from the people whose lives are affected, resulting in dissatisfaction and alienation. The great mass of people, whom the intellectuals of the ruling elites look down on, are too savvy to fall for it. Most of the problems in the developed nations and in those third world nations the western powers have recently meddled in, spring from the elites, the people who make decisions that affect the lives of millions, being completely out of touch with the lives and concerns of ordinary people.

If or rather when voters in Sweden are next to send the message, “We have rights too,” whether it will shock the unelected bureaucrats who effectively run the EU into awareness of their predicament, or whether they will try to punish the Swedes for not vosting the way they should have, as we have seen in the cases of Britain and Italy could decide if the EU has a long term future.

It is certain the Social Democrats, who have ruled in Sweden for most of the last hundred years, will see their numbers in the Swedish parliament vastly reduced. Some polls even show the Sweden Democrats could become the largest party, though there is a discrepancy between polls that use self-selecting online panels (which show the far-right winning the largest share) and the standard polls (which have the Social Democrats narrowly in first place).

Among the smaller parties, the Greens, the Liberals, and the Christian Democrats are all at risk of missing the 4% threshold to gain seats parliament under the proportional representation system. If one of the smaller parties drops out of parliament it would alter the balance between the two mainstream blocks, but would not leave either much closer to a majority.

Following soon after the Italian Eurosceptic, anti immigration alliance of Lega and Five Star crushed traditional parties, and with anti EU governments in Poland, Hungary and Austria, Angela Merkel’s CDU hanging on to power through a very fragile coalition with the CSU, Spain’s socialist government teetering on the edge of collapse, the UK half out of the door and Macron’s French government having caused civil unrest, the EU is in big trouble already. The Sweden Democrats have called for a referendum on EU membership, while the Liberals want Sweden to join the euro. Both look unlikely. Neither is a realistic political proposition: polls suggest Swedes are content with the status quo — less than a quarter would support leaving the EU, and less than 20% want to join the euro.

In fact most nations now in conflict with Brussels want to remain in the EU, but a vastly reformed EU which respects members’ sovereignty, drops its commitment to ‘open doors’ immigration policy and abandons “The European Project” of unifying the continent politically to create a European superstate. In other words, if it is to survive the EU must abandon its ambitions to be a pan European government of unelected bureaucrats and return to being a free trade and economic cooperation association for European states.

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Opted for comfortable retirement before I was fifty due to health problems and burn out. Now spend my time writing and goofing around. Home: northern England..

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